Remarkable Scientist

“Do not let yourself be tainted with a barren skepticism.”

Louis Pasteur is one of the most remarkable names in the field of medicine. From a humble beginning, he grew up to make extraordinary contributions to society, including the vaccines for rabies and anthrax, and the processes of Pasteurization and Sterilization. His love for science stemmed from everyday problems that people faced regularly.

From a Tanner’s Son, to a Famous Scientist

Louis Pasteur and russian doctor Leonid Ivanovich Voinov, with russian children cured of rabies, 1886

Louis Pasteur believed he could do anything as long as he put his mind and heart into it. His inquisitiveness helped him overcome his apprehensions. Pasteur’s desire to help others and excel in the field of science paved the way for changing the course of medicinal history.

Of Phonographs, Light bulbs, and Motion-Picture Cameras

Thomas Edison posing with the group who perfected the phonograph, 16 June 1888.

Gramophones, light bulbs, and cameras are some of the devices we use regularly. They light up our houses and provide entertainment by letting us capture the moments worth remembering. It has been more than a hundred years since Thomas Edison invented these. Effort and endless hours of experimentation were poured into the invention of these devices, and are testament to Edison’s character.

Wizard of Menlo Park

Thomas Edison and his early phonograph.

Thomas Alva Edison is considered one of the greatest inventors of all time. Through success and failure, Edison strived hard and, as a result, had more than 1,000 patents to his name. From the perceived invention of the light bulb to the ‘War of Currents’, Edison remains one of the most divisive figures in the history of the scientific community.

The President’s Faith

President Reagan addresses the Ecumenical Prayer Breakfast at Reunion Arena in Dallas, Texas, 23-Aug-1984.

Ronald Reagan believed politics, morality and religion are inseparable. His Christian upbringing carried on to his Presidentship where he strove for a tolerant society, encouraging all religions.

Actor turned President

President Ronald Reagan addresses party-goers assembled in the Rotunda of the National Museum of Natural History's at the Inaugural Ball in January 1981

During his heyday, Ronald Reagan was the emblem for the effort to restore American conservative values, and propagate and integrate these ideals in the constitution through aggressive lawmaking. A cool head on steady shoulders, he survived an assassination attempt and led the country through a period of great turmoil.